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What Was The End Of Killing The Tyrant, But To Be Free From Tyranny?, When, and how, do we obtain redress?

Anthony
post Aug 1 2014, 03:11 PM
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“What was the end ofkilling the tyrant, but to be free from tyranny? A ridiculous motive, and an empty exploit, ifour slavery survive him.” Cicero,quoted in Cato’s Letters, #23, p. 169.

Rob, and associates,

I’ve followed your website formore than a year now, and I must express my disappointment. Yes, you do fine research, perhaps excellent,even unrivaled, almost.

My disappointment stems from the factthat you (the people behind Pilots) are using no more than one fifth, possiblyas little as one tenth, of the power available to you thru First-Amendmentassemblies.

The quote by Cicero is part of thelegacy won by the American Revolution; not because he said it, but, because theEnglish rebel, John Elliot, authored an example of it.

American Founders relied heavilyon English rebels for direction and procedures needed to successfully win theirbid for independence; the Petition of Rights of 1628, the Grand Remonstrance of1640, the so-called Bill of Rights of 1688, among many other milestones ofliberty.

One of the more significant itemswas the resolution introduced by John Elliot by which taxes imposed without theconsent of parliament was made a capital offense. The measure was passed by the House ofCommons before Charles dissolved parliament and arrested several members. Twelve years later, parliamentused Elliot’s resolution as the basis to take down judges and taxcollectors, a bishop and kings for asserting “the divine right of kings” andimposing taxes that had not received the assent of parliament.

No, I don’t recommend that we killtyrants and their useful idiots; it would put them out of their misery toosoon. I think it would be much better torecover the booty they took– even if we have to chase them to the ends of the earth.

And, no, we can’t rely on currentforums of redress; they are dominated by bandit and useful-idiot classes whowill not allow any meaningful investigation – much less, any prosecution – ofthemselves. When the Justice Departmentconceived and directed “Fast and Furious”, did you really expect them toprosecute themselves for it?

Silly season is over; we have toget serious. If there is to be anyredress, we must use the only historically-proven method that has ever broughtworthwhile redress: substantially the same method used by American Founders.

The trouble is there is hardly anAmerican today that even suspects the existence of this method: he simply hasno knowledge of it.

For example, Founders repeatedlydeclared that “no man is obligated to obey any law or pay any tax unless he hasgiven consent to it”. Did they mean thisliterally? Of course they did. From the first English settlement to theRevolution this was how affairs of the colonies were managed. Every “law” and every “tax” had its origin incontracts between colonial assemblies and those who petitioned for redress ofgrievances. The terms of the contractwere sometimes referred to as “laws” of the contract while its money paymentswere treated as “taxes”. And only petitionerswere obligated to obey such “laws” and pay such “taxes”. When redress was completed, related “laws”and “taxes” expired.

There, in one paragraph I conveyedto you more real history than you learned in 12 years of elementary and highschools, and 4-6 years of university indoctrination. You won’t learn this and other lessons fromprofessors, or judges, or lawyers; the first two depend on continued grievancesfor their pensions, the third never learned such history, or law.

This right of consent was won withthe Revolution… and who knows it?

This is just one of many examplesof real American history and law Americans don’t know; and that they must learnif there is to be any redress relative to a mountain range of grievances.

Until men learn these lessons ofhistory, those who suffer from, and those who complain about, grievances mustwallow in a stifling swamp of impotence: that condition where men only pretendat reason, justice, and civilization.

No, it won’t be easy and it won’tbe quick. Unprecedented adventures neverare.

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