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Major Win' For Japan Opposition, ending 50 years rule

André
post Aug 30 2009, 10:50 AM
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Does this mean anything since the DPJ has questioned the official 911 story ?

The opposition Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) is set for a massive election victory, exit polls suggest.

The DPJ has won 300 seats in the 480-seat lower house, ending 50 years of almost unbroken rule by the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), NHK TV says.

The DPJ says it will shift the focus of government from supporting corporations to helping consumers and workers.

Prime Minister Taro Aso has said he will resign as head of the LDP, taking responsibility for the defeat.

Japan is suffering record unemployment and its economy is struggling to emerge from a bruising recession.

Analysts say voters blame the conservative LDP for the current economic malaise - and are angry enough to opt for change.

Reform bureaucracy

The exit polls suggest a stunning reversal of fortune for Japan's political parties, reducing the LDP to a rump in parliament, correspondents say.

Mr Aso's party has governed Japan for all but 11 months since 1955.

more... http://news.bbc.co.uk/
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André
post Sep 1 2009, 11:13 AM
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DPJ leader Yukio Hatoyama

Japan must reject US-led globalisation

In the post-Cold War period, Japan has been continually buffeted by the winds of market fundamentalism in a US-led movement that is more usually called globalisation. Freedom is supposed to be the highest of all values, but in the fundamentalist pursuit of capitalism people are treated not as an end but as a means. Consequently, human dignity has been lost.

The recent financial crisis and its aftermath have once again forced us to take note of this reality. How can we put an end to unrestrained market fundamentalism and financial capitalism that are void of morals or moderation in order to protect the fin-ances and livelihoods of our citizens? That is the issue we are now facing.

In these times, we must return to the idea of fraternity - as in the French slogan liberte, egalite, fraternite - as a force for moderating the danger inherent within freedom. It must be the compass that determines our political direction, a yardstick for deciding our policies. The idea of fraternity is also the spirit behind our idea of achieving 'an era of independence and coexistence' in today's world.

Fraternity as I mean it can be described as a principle that aims to adjust to the excesses of the current globalised brand of capitalism and accommodate the local economic practices that have been fostered through our traditions.

The recent worldwide economic crisis resulted from a way of thinking based on the principle that American-style free-market economics represents a universal and ideal economic order - and that all countries should modify the traditions and regulations governing their own economy in order to reform the structure of their economic society in line with global standards (or rather American standards).

The economic order or local economic activities in any country are built up over long years and reflect the influence of each country's traditions, habits and national lifestyles. However, globalism progressed without any regard for various non-economic values, nor for environmental issues or problems of resource restriction. If we look back on the changes in Japanese society that have occurred since the end of the Cold War, I believe it is no exaggeration to say that the global economy has damaged traditional economic activities and destroyed local communities.

Capital and means of production can now be transferred easily across international borders. However, people cannot move so easily. In terms of market theory, people are simply personnel expenses, but in the real world people support the fabric of the local community and are the physical embodiment of its lifestyle, traditions and culture. An individual gains respect as a person by acquiring a job and a role within the local community and being able to maintain his family's livelihood.

The recent financial crisis has suggested to many people that the era of American unilateralism may come to an end. It has also made people harbour doubts about the permanence of the dollar as the key global currency. I also feel that as a result of the failure of the Iraq war and the financial crisis, the era of US-led globalism is coming to an end and that we are moving away from a unipolar world towards an era of multipolarity.

However, at present, there is no one country ready to replace the United States as the world's most dominant country. Neither is there a currency ready to replace the dollar as the world's key currency.

Although the influence of the US is declining, it will remain the world's leading military and economic power for the next two to three decades. Current developments show clearly that China, which has by far the world's largest population, will become one of the world's leading economic nations, while also continuing to expand its military power.

The size of China's economy will surpass that of Japan in the not-too-distant future. How should Japan maintain its political and economic independence and protect its national interest when caught between the United States, which is fighting to retain its position as the world's dominant power, and China, which is seeking ways to become dominant?

This is a question of concern not only to Japan but also to the small and medium-sized nations in Asia. They want the military power of the US to function effectively for the stability of the region but want to restrain US political and economic excesses. They also want to reduce the military threat posed by our neighbour China while ensuring that China's expanding economy develops in an orderly fashion. These are major factors accelerating regional integration.

Japan should nonetheless aspire to move towards regional currency integration as a natural extension of the rapid economic growth begun by Japan, followed by South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, and then achieved by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and China. These countries must therefore spare no effort to build the permanent security frameworks essential to underpinning currency integration.

Establishing a common Asian currency will likely take more than 10 years. For such a single currency to bring about political integration will surely take longer still.

http://www.gulfnews.com/

This post has been edited by André: Sep 2 2009, 02:27 AM
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JimMac
post Sep 1 2009, 12:41 PM
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QUOTE (André @ Sep 1 2009, 11:13 AM) *
DPJ leader Yukio Hatoyama

Japan must reject US-led globalisation

<snip>

Japan should nonetheless aspire to move towards regional currency integration as a natural extension of the rapid economic growth begun by Japan, followed by South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, and then achieved by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and China. These countries must therefore spare no effort to build the permanent security frameworks essential to underpinning currency integration.



US-led globalism is coming to an end


Wow, that was an interesting read to say the least. I especially tuned into the above paragraph, an absolute declaration of independence, and war if necessary, to break free of the reign of an American Global Empire that has rolled over them; especially after the Cold War.

So we entered a new era in Global politics two decades ago. A tug of war ensued between a unipolar world gaining control, verses a multi-polar world escaping control of one-world domination led by US-corporatism.

Its going to be a battle..
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Daniels
post Sep 1 2009, 07:43 PM
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Great words, but I note that they are not the words of the new Japanese gov; rather, they are the words of a columnist.

Oops, my bad. They are indeed the words of the Japanese gov!!

This post has been edited by Daniels: Sep 1 2009, 07:47 PM
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Sanders
post Sep 2 2009, 01:54 AM
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Very unusual words from a Japanese politician in that high a position - he is probably going to be the next prime-minister here. Makes me somewhat hopeful about the future here in Japan ... I wonder how Hatoyama feels about or is aware of Fujita's position on 9/11?
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p.w.rapp
post Sep 2 2009, 06:57 AM
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I was waiting for this topic about the sensational elections in Japan and for Sanders' comments from Japan.
(and admittedly had no time to start a topic myself wink.gif )


QUOTE (Sanders @ Sep 2 2009, 07:54 AM) *
Very unusual words from a Japanese politician in that high a position - he is probably going to be the next prime-minister here. Makes me somewhat hopeful about the future here in Japan ... I wonder how Hatoyama feels about or is aware of Fujita's position on 9/11?


Hatoyama is more than aware of Fujita's position on 9/11
He was one of the speakers on the occasion of the publishing of Mr. Fujita’s 9/11 book at the Tokyo Dome Hotel. smile.gif


QUOTE
During the second part of the event formal greetings to Mr. Fujita were presented by the following speakers:

Tadashi Inuzuka, Member of Parliament, member of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence LINK Hideaki Seo, director of Sundai School, chair of the Fujita Political and Economic Forum Yukio Hatoyama, secretary general of the Democratic Party of Japan LINK ...

http://www.daily.pk/hatoyama-allied-with-911-truth-9882/
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Sanders
post Sep 2 2009, 02:00 PM
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QUOTE (p.w.rapp @ Sep 6 2009, 04:57 AM) *
Hatoyama is more than aware of Fujita's position on 9/11
He was one of the speakers on the occasion of the publishing of Mr. Fujita’s 9/11 book at the Tokyo Dome Hotel. smile.gif



Far Out !!!!!


Thanks for the heads up PW. Until now I had been reserved in my optimism, a couple of months ago the DPJ changed their official position on a couple of issues, most notably refueling coalition forces in the Indian Ocean, Japan's token involvement in the "war on terror" ... prior to that the DJP had been soldly against any Japanese involvement in these wars. So I figured they were positioned for a win and some back-room negotiations had taken place, whereby the DJP changed their opposition to the war somewhat in return for what I don't know - "permission" to win, I guess you could call it.

But if Hatoyama does become the Prime Minister and means what he says, things could get very interesting.

yes1.gif

..............

EDIT

http://news.antiwar.com/2009/09/01/us-rule...t-on-base-deal/
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Omega892R09
post Sep 2 2009, 03:52 PM
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QUOTE
...Current developments show clearly that China, which has by far the world's largest population, will become one of the world's leading economic nations, while also continuing to expand its military power.

The size of China's economy will surpass that of Japan in the not-too-distant future. How should Japan maintain its political and economic independence and protect its national interest when caught between the United States, which is fighting to retain its position as the world's dominant power, and China, which is seeking ways to become dominant?...

The ghost of Admiral Zheng He ("jung huh") rides again.
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