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Is There A Delayed Reaction For The Controls Of A Modern Jetliner?

paulmichael
post Jul 7 2013, 10:02 AM
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Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I think that I remember that, during a news report years ago about an incident involving a then-newly-released Airbus model, it was mentioned that there was a whopping SEVEN second delay between the pilot's movement of a cockpit control and the aircraft's response.

The webpage about a 747 simulator at http://ezinearticles.com/?Take-to-the-Frie...&id=3886699 states:

If you were flying a fighter plane or a small aircraft, the reaction time with the controls would be instantaneous. However, when you are flying the Jumbo Jet [747], the reaction time is much slower, so you have to think ahead and anticipate turns and changes in altitude.

The above cited webpage seems to ratify my memory.

Regarding the recent Asiana Airlines 777 crash in San Francisco: I listened to the verbal accounts of eyewitnesses about how the 777 was coming in too low, too slow, and with too much of a nose-up attitude, but it wasn't until I saw an animated simulation of the incident on ABC News that it seemed to me that the pilot knew that he was making a very bad landing and that he could not touch down on a proper spot on the runway. The plane was already nose-up as usual; the pilot attempted to abort landing and take-off again, but his raising of the plane's nose even more and a delayed reaction by the 777's engines (as mentioned above as possibilities in the cases of the Airbus and 747) were out of sync at the worst critical moment, and, as you probably already know, calamity resulted, the tail section having been lopped off on impact with the seawall at the end of the runway.

If I am at all off-base with my take on things, and if there is some aviation expert in the audience who can set things straight, please, by all means, do so.

Mention was made on ABC News that there may not have been engine power on the Asiana 777 when it was needed.

Now, 757 and 767 model aircraft were allegedly used for the terror strikes on 9/11.

Here's my question: do the 757 and 767 aircraft have any delayed reaction in their fly-by-wire control systems? If so, I think that it would be IMPOSSIBLE for a novice pilot under incredible stress to cope with such delayed reaction and to carryout out any 9/11 mission successfully.

What I do remember is that shortly after 9/11, an experienced pilot stated on T.V. that trying to steer a passenger airliner is like trying to steer an ocean liner... but if this is due in large part to delayed reactions of the aircraft's controls, nothing was ever stated about this. (Hmmm, maybe sanitized from the news like so many other things?)

What's really amazing is that, while the events of 9/11 vastly impacted the lives of airline personnel, the number of people from the airline industry commenting on the events of 9/11 in the mainstream media can be counted on the fingers of the hand of a farmer who got that hand caught in his grim reaper. How in the world did the airline industry [seemingly] put a lid, that is, a gag order on the free speech of its people... apparently through to this very late date... this, not to mention silence on the part of Boeing? There are some things in this world that just escape my understanding.

P.M.
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