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Whistleblower Reveals "backdoor" 757 Remote Control And Flight Crew "lockout" Technology, Available Prior To 9/11 - Pilots For 9/11 Truth

wayneanderson
post May 24 2010, 09:04 PM
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QUOTE (Omega892R09 @ May 22 2010, 12:36 PM) *
The F4K for example had banks of circuit breakers in the pilot's cockpit and even larger banks in the observer's (RIO in the US I think).
* *
I was basically airframes and engines but with the F4 one had to understand the electrical system in some detail so as to be able to conduct diagnostic checks. The F4K had a rather complex engine control system with a 7th-12th stage (compressor) switchover for specific flap conditions and rapid reheat selection so that a bolter could be conducted with a chance of survival. Also into the engine/reheat/boundary-layer blow system was an interlink to the nose gear leg double extension of 40 in (20 in on other F4s). How often did I sit on a cat' with hold back on, nose leg at full extension, flaps down with blow and full A/B on both burners to check that the nose leg caption lights worked to schedule!

Those circuit breakers were something else too. We had one F4K that failed to retract the U/C after launch because the nose gear strut would not shrink, not even by emergency (pneumatic) selection. I recall being down in the maintenance hangar on Ark, and a pipe made to the effect that Phantom 007 was probably be ditching close to the ship, when the CO appeared with a brace of AEO/ALOs discussing options. One that was explored was by popping certain circuit breakers the U/C could be made to retract irrespective of the leg extension condition (more micro-switches here to prevent such a thing under normal circumstances). This all explored by studying of the electrical system diagrams in the APs (Air Publications for the aircraft) and how to isolate certain micro-switches.

This so that a diversion ashore could be made with a U/C up (belly) landing. Then I noted one draw back. I suggested that with a nose leg fully extended, if the undercarriage was retracted, nose leg up as far as it would go, then the mag' alloy nose wheels would be directly under the LOX pack. He diverted ashore and completed a text book landing with a ridged nose strut. Those stabilator tips must have been THAT close to the deck.

==============
Very interesting to say the least. I was in the Navy as an Avionics Technician long before I entered the airline career. The reserve fighter squadron I was in transitioned from the F8 Crusader to the F4N. In the N model they removed all that mechanical controls for the nosegear extend with a guarded switch in the cockpit. So they didn't have to do all the high power AB tests on the catapult to check out the system. It was a lot more reliable also.

Wayne

This post has been edited by wayneanderson: May 24 2010, 09:28 PM
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wayneanderson
post May 24 2010, 09:27 PM
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QUOTE (elreb @ May 20 2010, 06:30 PM) *
FOR WHAT IS WORTH HISTORY

In 1983, Chicago's Pritzker family bought Braniff International out of bankruptcy and separated the maintenance department -- including its huge hangar on Lemmon Avenue on the east side of Love Field -- from the airline.

The Pritzkers eventually sold Braniff, which later failed. They kept the old maintenance division and renamed it Dalfort Aviation. In 1993, the family sold it to Leadbetter, its longtime Dallas representative.

Leadbetter struggled to keep the Dalfort hangar consistently full of work.

Two attempts to lure aircraft manufacturers as tenants failed. Then he decided to launch a specialty airline that would contract with Dalfort to maintain its planes, and operate from a new terminal that would be built on the north end of the Dalfort hangar.

To push the notion of limited-capacity long-haul service at Love Field, Leadbetter teamed up with Allan McArtor a former FAA Administrator, Federal Express executive and Air Force pilot. Mr. McArtor was also a member of the United States Air Force precision flying team, the Thunderbirds knew Washington from the inside out.

It took him nearly four years, but McArtor successfully argued that long-haul service from Love Field in planes with 56 or fewer seats would be permissible under the Wright Amendment.

In the meantime, Leadbetter could not wait for Legend Airlines to get started and had to sell Dalfort to pay off his debt to the Pritzkers.

Yet, even as Legend prepared to launch service, it was clear that real estate values were still a key force behind the airline.

Legend announced that it had raised more than $60 million in start-up financing. Much of that money came from the Hampstead Group, a Dallas-based investment group led by Don McNamara, an adviser to Fort Worth's billionaire Bass family and sweetheart investors.


But not all of that money was invested in the airline. Some of those investors, including Hampstead, invested more than $20 million of it through a separate corporation to build a posh six-gate executive terminal attached to the Dalfort hangar, plus a 7-story, 750-space parking garage.

The Bass brothers are sons of Perry R. Bass the patriarch of a family that came to symbolize wealth and oil in Texas. Three of Mr. Bass's sons Sid, Lee and Edward — invested with their father. In 1983, a fourth son, Robert, broke away to form his own investment firm. Following in their father's footsteps, each of the four attended Yale University; Ed and George W. Bush were classmates and friends there. As Governor, Bush appointed Lee Bass as Chairman of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Robert Muse Bass is currently the chairman of Aerion Corporation, an American aerospace firm in Reno, Nevada. Bass is worth approximately $5.5 billion as of 2007. Most recently, in 2004 he started Aerion Corp to develop supersonic corporate jets, which is the beneficiary of lucrative Federal DARPA contracts.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. DARPA has been responsible for funding the development of many technologies which have had a major effect on the world, including computer networking, as well as NLS "oN-Line System", which was both the first hypertext system, and an important precursor to the contemporary ubiquitous graphical user interface.

--------
There has always been one mystery about the Braniff/Dalfort history that I could never solve. There was this Astrea Aviation in the background all the time. Even employee withholding statements were Astrea Aviation: dba Braniff Airways OR Astrea Aviation: dba Braniff International OR Astrea Aviation: dba Dalfort Aviation and on and on.

The reason that I dug into this is that all the original Braniff employees retirement plan got raped by the insurance companies that supposedly owned the original Braniff to the tune the retirees got 10 cents on the dollar; ie $800.oo per month pension became $80.oo.... There were a lot of angry folks, many my friends, working at Dalfort and then some agency called PEBC [not sure exact name] came in and threatened these folks if they didn't voluntarily stop drawing their Braniff pension or resign their position at Dalfort. Geeez I felt sorry for those old guys so I spent a couple of days off at SMU Law library and some law students helped me research this situation. The result was I typed up a short report on my findings and at the end of which I encouraged the retirees to take this information to their personal attorneys before they caved in to pressures and signed something they would regret.

Management was overwhelmed when my 25 or so copies became a circulation of several hundred to a thousand. They called me on the carpet threatened termination if I didn't stop circulating the letter to which I dutifully agreed. Unknowns to them their toner and paper probably made the vast majority of the circulation and I didn't have to do anything more anyway.

But, just maybe someone here can find out who was, or who is, this elusive Astrea Aviation.

Wayne
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Johnny Angel
post May 29 2010, 09:40 PM
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A few years ago, I recall watching a short video on one of the 911 sites. (I cant recall the exact video)

The Point being that a passenger jet could be flown by remote controll. It was one of the early Boeing passenger jets loaded with dummys and a camera. The Jet was remotely controllled doing all type of stunts to check out how much the Jet, dummys or Human passengers could tolerate.

I would assume that this video was made by Boeing Aircraft.

Is there anyone else here that recalls seeing such a Video.??
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paranoia
post May 29 2010, 11:14 PM
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QUOTE (Johnny Angel @ May 29 2010, 09:40 PM) *
A few years ago, I recall watching a short video on one of the 911 sites. (I cant recall the exact video)

The Point being that a passenger jet could be flown by remote controll. It was one of the early Boeing passenger jets loaded with dummys and a camera. The Jet was remotely controllled doing all type of stunts to check out how much the Jet, dummys or Human passengers could tolerate.

I would assume that this video was made by Boeing Aircraft.

Is there anyone else here that recalls seeing such a Video.??


do u mean this one?

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tnemelckram
post May 30 2010, 12:10 AM
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Figures . . . . the Weather Channel . . . . in between the endless commercials, sometimes they squeeze in a few minutes of weather, or forget the weather to spew this pap to the Sheep touting how the government is being very competent and protective by developing this technology.

What's ironic is that on 911 the government used this very same thing against those who the Weather Channel tried to comfort.
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Omega892R09
post May 30 2010, 01:06 PM
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QUOTE (wayneanderson @ May 22 2010, 11:27 PM) *
But, just maybe someone here can find out who was, or who is, this elusive Astrea Aviation.

Wayne

Well search engine hits turn up references to

San Diego Sheriff's ASTREA aviation wing

ASTREA aviation facility in Fallbrook that will provide a presence for aircraft in the North. County to combat wildfires.

Guinn spends $3 million; Russo reports $1.1 million

QUOTE
Meanwhile Las Vegas Mayor Jan Laverty Jones, a late entrant in the contest for the Democratic nomination, reported she has received $758,614 and spent $527,510.

Like Guinn, Jones got some big contributions from Las Vegas gaming companies or individuals. For instance, Steve Wynn's five casinos -- the not-yet-open Bellagio, the Golden Nugget in Laughlin and the Golden Nugget, Mirage and Treasure Island in Las Vegas, each gave $10,000.

Jones reported $10,000 donations each from Jack Binion, Harrah's in Las Vegas, the Horseshoe, Lady Luck, Palace Station, SES Gaming, Station Casinos and the Tropicana.

Other $10,000 contributions to the mayor came from Astrea Aviation Services; Bryan Carney, Coast West Inc., Facilities Communications, James Gilstrap, Eric Hanson, Mark Johnson, John Larson, Los Potros Polo Farms and Paul Steelman.


And other ref's to Dallas.
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Maha Mantra
post May 31 2010, 12:39 AM
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I recognized those test-dummies, they are actually CIA agents with carefully developed aliases !
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elreb
post Jun 2 2010, 01:36 PM
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In 1984 NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) teamed-up in a unique flight experiment called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), to test the impact of a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with an additive designed to suppress fire. The additive FM-9, a high molecular-weight long chain polymer, when blended with Jet-A fuel had demonstrated the capability to inhibit ignition and flame propagation of the released fuel in simulated impact tests.

On the morning of December 1, 1984, a remotely controlled Boeing 720 transport took off from Edwards Air Force Base (Edwards, California), made a left-hand departure and climbed to an altitude of 2300 feet. It then began a descent-to-landing to a specially prepared runway on the east side of Rogers Dry Lake. Final approach was along the roughly 3.8-degree glide slope. The landing gear was left retracted. Passing the decision height of 150 feet above ground level (AGL), the aircraft was slightly to the right of the desired path. Just above that decision point at which the pilot was to execute a "go-around," there appeared to be enough altitude to maneuver back to the centerline of the runway. Data acquisition systems had been activated, and the aircraft was committed to impact. It contacted the ground, left wing low. The fire and smoke took over an hour to extinguish.

This flight, called the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID), was the culmination of more than a year of preparation in a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test the effectiveness of anti-misting kerosene (AMK) in a so-called survivable impact. Added to typical Jet A fuel, the AMK was designed to suppress the fireball that can result from an impact in which the airstream causes spilled fuel to vaporize into a mist.

The plane was also instrumented for a variety of other impact-survivability experiments, including new seat designs, flight data recorders, galley and stowage-bin attachments, cabin fire-proof materials, and burn-resistant windows. Crash forces were measured, and a full complement of instrumented crash test dummies was carried on the flight.

The aircraft was remotely flown by NASA research pilot Fitzhugh (Fitz) Fulton from the NASA Dryden Remotely ControlledVehicle Facility. Previously, the Boeing 720 had been flown on 14 practice flights with safety pilots onboard. During the 14 flights, there were 16 hours and 22 minutes of remotely piloted vehicle control, including 10 remotely piloted takeoffs, 69 remotely piloted vehicle controlled approaches, and 13 remotely piloted vehicle landings on abort runway.

It was planned that the aircraft would land wings-level and exactly on the centerline during the CID, thus allowing the fuselage to remain intact as the wings were sliced open by eight posts cemented into the runway. The Boeing 720 landed askew and caused a cabin fire when burning fuel was able to enter the fuselage.

It was not exactly the impact that was hoped for, but research from the CID program yielded new data on impact survivability which helped establish new FAA rules regarding fire prevention and retardant materials. Although proponents argued that AMK prevented a hotter, more catastrophic fire during the CID, FAA requirements for the additive were put on the back burner.
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elreb
post Jun 2 2010, 01:45 PM
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Wow…

In 1984 they could remotely takeoff, fly and land a large commercial airliner.

The fully fueled craft only burned for one hour, mostly on the exterior.

The craft still existed; landing gears, engines, test dummies and flight data recorders.

Hum…

Download complete report http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1988000639.pdf

The 720 is about the same size as a 757

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elreb
post Jun 2 2010, 06:28 PM
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This is really smoking gun material.

FAA owned = tail N23, joint project between FAA, NASA and Edwards AFB.

The 720 was “solely flown by remote control by one man” = retired Air Force pilot Lt. Colonel Fritz Fulton Jr.

Compared to the Pentagon crash, this report states that the impact scenario was difficult due to a gear up landing and ground effects but did state that it was survivable.

One of the three state of the art “Flight Data Recorders” on this craft was a solid state memory FDR provided by Lear Siegler.

(Yes, the same William Lear of Lear Jet) In 2001 this company was was wholly-owned by “The Carlyle Group”.
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mhgaffney
post Jun 14 2010, 03:34 PM
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Today, I tried without success to reach a David Prentice at Jacobs Technology in San Antonio. Jacobs has two different offices there but no David Prentice on staff.

I then tried information and reached a David Prentice in San Anton by telephone. However, this Prentice is not an engineer. Wrong man.

Anyone have better luck?
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wayneanderson
post Jun 17 2010, 05:02 PM
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QUOTE (mhgaffney @ Jun 14 2010, 01:34 PM) *
Today, I tried without success to reach a David Prentice at Jacobs Technology in San Antonio. Jacobs has two different offices there but no David Prentice on staff.

I then tried information and reached a David Prentice in San Anton by telephone. However, this Prentice is not an engineer. Wrong man.

Anyone have better luck?

The Dalfort Avionics Engineer, David Prentice, actually went to work for
Continental Airlines.

Last I saw him on Linkedin listed Continental, Houston,Texas.
Avionics Engineer, MASTER.

That listing is gone now; was some months ago.
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mhgaffney
post Jun 28 2010, 02:00 PM
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On June 21 I reached David Prentice at Continental Airlines in Houston where he works. Prentice confirmed that he worked at Dalfort Aviation in Dallas in the 1990s. He also remembered Wayne Anderson. Thus, Prentice confirms Wayne's background.

However, Prentice denied that he ever conducted a remote control test at Love Field.

Obviously, Wayne Anderson and David Prentice cannot both be telling the truth.

Fortunately, Wayne remembered the name of another avionics tech, Ray Bedard, who, he says, was also present that day and can confirm that a remote control test happened. That is, assuming Bedard is still alive and is willing to talk about it. With details provided by Wayne, I searched the Internet and retrieved several possible addresses for Ray Bedard. The records indicate he lives in Texas. Unfortunately, I have not been able to reach Bedard by phone. None of the numbers I have tried are still in service.

We may need to send someone in the flesh to track down this potential key witness. If anyone lives in the Dallas or Austin areas, and would like to help out, please send me a message and I will get backatcha.

Mark H Gaffney

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paranoia
post Jun 28 2010, 05:09 PM
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mr.gaffney,

after some in-depth searching of the internets, i found what i think is a viable lead that could get you in touch with mr.bedard. first here is a list of those in his immediate family:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancest...orsb/pafg08.htm

one of them, Stephen Legrand VICKERS, his son in law, is rather easy to find:
https://sites.televox.com/drvickers/site.htm

or here:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Houston-TX/V...al/137380254773

-perhaps the good doctor might be willing to help you reach mr.bedard.


ps - i tried to private message you instead of posting here, but apparently you are not allowed to receive pm's (not sure if you have the function turned off or if its because you have only 2 posts... )
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paranoia
post Jun 28 2010, 05:18 PM
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also - if know any HAM operators or have access to one, you can try to hit him up directly:

http://www.aprsme.com/license?c=W5BBI
http://www.qrz.com/db/W5BBI

thumbsup.gif


eta:
http://www.qsl.net/k0rwu/guestbook/guestbook.html
QUOTE
Thank you paul for a most interesting look at your ham and flying experiences. I have been in ham radio since 1953. I soloed in an aeronica champ in 1951 while still in high school. Never did get a pvt license but love to fly. I was a cw op in the army from 54 to 56. Eventually ended up as an avionics tech for Braniff Airlines which later became Dalfort Aviation. I retired in 1996 and moved from Dallas to east texas where I now live with my bride Nancy. We will celebrate our 48th anniversary Oct 9th. Ijust want to thank you for this nice web page. I just got a pc about a month ago. vy best 73 fer now Ray Bedard W5BBI

Ray L. Bedard <thebedards at sbcglobal dot net>
Lindale, TX USA - Wednesday September 18, 2ØØ2 2Ø:56:Ø1 (EDT)
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Ricochet
post Jun 28 2010, 06:14 PM
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Hi Mark, welcome to P4T, I enjoy your writing.
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mhgaffney
post Jun 28 2010, 08:45 PM
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Thanks, Paranoia. Those leads looks very promising.

And thank you Ricochet for the kind words!

This post has been edited by mhgaffney: Jun 28 2010, 09:02 PM
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rob balsamo
post Jun 28 2010, 09:39 PM
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QUOTE (mhgaffney @ Jun 28 2010, 02:00 PM) *
On June 21 I reached David Prentice at Continental Airlines in Houston where he works. Prentice confirmed that he worked at Dalfort Aviation in Dallas in the 1990s. He also remembered Wayne Anderson. Thus, Prentice confirms Wayne's background.

However, Prentice denied that he ever conducted a remote control test at Love Field.

Obviously, Wayne Anderson and David Prentice cannot both be telling the truth.


I spoke to Capt Ralph Kolstad about this.

He remembers a mechanic at American describing the same type of test which was performed on their aircraft. He is trying to track down that mechanic.

Ralph also confirms American Airlines 757/767 aircraft have been Mode S equipped "for decades".

Still waiting to hear back from my United guys.
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gugu2dede2
post Aug 28 2010, 04:37 AM
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QUOTE (GroundPounder @ May 18 2010, 12:01 AM) *
dang..thought airbus was the only one to put 'silicon' before 'carbon units'.

Now that is scary,you have just given me a week full of nightmares. thumbsup.gif
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