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Limitations of Video and Photo "Evidence", edited from "Interesting Video Of Wtc7 Damage"

ogrady
post Jul 15 2008, 08:28 PM
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Just found this on another forum today. What do you think of this? Evidence of DEW?

Something different that I've never seen before.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=PVahuOpOJYE
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dMz
post Jun 1 2009, 10:33 PM
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I often see discussions about "photographic evidence." I usually see some very key concepts left out of most of these discussions, unfortunately. Over the years, I have done some work-related technical photography [and photoanalysis] for documentation, training, and communication/presentation purposes. Forensic photography is very similar to technical photography in many respects.

Let's concentrate some research on forensic photography specifically though.

http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/fet-ol.html

NOTE: This is the student outline for the Forensic Photography section (24 hours of instruction)of the Field Evidence Technician Course (a 80 hour course) presented by the Center for Criminal Justice Research and Training, California State University, Long Beach

I. TECHNICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
A. Basic equipment for crime scene photography
1. Camera(s)
2. Normal lens
3. Wide angle lens
4. Close-up lenses or accessories
5. Filters
6. Electronic flash(s)
7. Remote or sync cord for electronic flash(s)
8. Extra camera and flash batteries
9. Locking cable release
10. Tripod
11. Film
12. Owner's manuals for camera and flash
13. Notebook and pen
14. Ruler

15. Gray card
16. Index cards and felt pen
17. Flashlight
B. Lenses
1. Normal lens
2. Wide angle lens
3. Other lenses
C. Care and maintenance of crime scene photography equipment
1. Cleaning lens and camera
2. Camera repair
3. Protection from extreme heat and cold
4. Protection from rain
D.Film
1. Color vs. black and white
2. Print film vs. slide film
3. Film speed
4. Matching film to the light source

II. CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY IS TECHNICAL PHOTOGRAPHY.
A. Photographs must be correctly exposed, have maximum depth
of field, be free from distortion and be in sharp focus
1. Correctly exposed
a. Exposure is controlled by the shutter speed and
lens aperture
b. Automated camera exposure systems and automatic
flash units can be fooled and give incorrect
exposures

c. Front, side and back lighting
d. Light meters
e. Flair
f. Using gray card
g. Bracketing exposures
2. Maximum depth of field
a. Depth of field is the area in a photograph in
which objects are in sharp focus

b. How to control depth of field
c. Zone focusing
(1) Preview depth of field
3. Free from distortion (must have good perspective)
a. Use a normal focal length lens when ever
possible
b. Keep the camera as level as possible
c. Photograph with the camera at eye level when
ever possible

4. Sharp focus
a. Keep the camera steady
b. Focus carefully and use maximum depth of field
c. Look at the frame of your scene


III. FLASH AND NIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
...
IV. CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY
A. Purpose of Crime Scene Photography
1. To record the original scene and related areas
2. To record the initial appearance of physical
evidence
3. It will provide investigators and others with this
permanent visual record of the scene for later use
4. Photographs are also used in court trials and
hearings
B. Admissibility of photographic evidence
1. Three major points of qualification of a photograph
in court
a. Object pictured must be material or relevant to
the point in issue
b. The photograph must not appeal to the emotions
or tend to prejudice the court or jury
c. The photograph must be free from distortion and
not misrepresent the scene or the object it
purports to reproduce
2. You do not need to be an expert in photography to
take crime scene photographs or testify about them


V. GENERAL CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY
A. Photographs are one way to record a crime scene
1. Field notes
2. Photographs
3. Sketches
B. Photographs
1. What photographs can show
2. What photographs do not show
C. Five steps in recording the crime scene
1. Secure the scene
2. Take preliminary notes
3. Take overview photographs
4. Make a basic sketch
5. Record each item of evidence
D. Taking overview photographs
1. Purpose
a. To show the scene exactly as it was when you
first saw it
(1) If something was moved before you arrived,
don't try to reconstruct the scene as it
was. The photographs should show the
scene as you found it

2. Major crime photography
a. First discuss the crime, evidence and
photographs needed with other investigators at
the scene
b. Be careful not to destroy any evidence while
taking the photographs
c. Outside the scene
(1) Exterior of the building where the crime
occurred and in some cases the whole
locale
(2) Aerial photographs of the scene and the
surrounding area can be useful in some
types of cases

(3) Original series of photographs should also
show all doors, windows and other means of
entrance or exit
d. Inside the scene
(1) Begin with a view of the entrance
(2) Then photograph the scene as it appears
when you first step into the room

(3) Next, move around the room to get
photographs of all the walls
(a) These photographs should also show
the positions of any potential items
of evidence

(4) Include photographs of other rooms
connected with the actual crime scene
3. Using video to record the crime scene
a. Frequently valuable to show an overview of the
scene
E. Photographs to record items of evidence
1. Take two photographs of each item of evidence
a. One should be an orientation (midrange) shot to
show how the item is related to its
surroundings
b. The second photograph should be a close-up to
bring out the details of the object itself
2. Measuring and marking devices
a. Take two photographs if a marking or measuring
device is used
(1) One photograph without the device, the
other with the device
(2) So the defence can't claim that the scene
was altered or that the device was
concealing anything important

...
D. Toolmarks
E. Serial numbers

-------------------------------------
Now does anyone care to make a list of what is conspicuously missing in many/most of the "aircraft parts" and "Pentagon" "evidence photos" we have seen in 9/11 research? (Note: the World Trade Center buildings themselves often provide a reasonably accurate measure of scale in many photos and video.)

EDIT: I would add the following to the above list:

- Tape Measures (30 foot, and ~200 foot reel types)
- LASER, optical, and/or sonic distance/range finders
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