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Seeking Air Phone Info

Leslie Landry
post Jan 25 2009, 09:14 PM
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QUOTE (787PIC @ Jan 25 2009, 06:54 PM) *
Airphones on commercial aircraft work on limited basis.
The user swipes a major credit card on the face of the phone and dials the number.
On United 757/767s which I flew only six(6) passengers at a time could use the system due to its limitations.
Cell phones generally do not work at all above 2-3000 feet above ground (land based antenna) level.

Ross Aimer


in regards to the Airphones/credit cards, one of the passengers on one of the flights..(the name is slipping my mind at the moment), it was said that during this frantic time, that she called collect to her family member when she had a credit card. I dont know about you but swipping a credit card to would be a hell of alot faster then having to go through the operator and having to wait to get your call accepted. just doesnt add up. This brings to mind on the curiousity on how many credit cards were actually used on the flights to place calls on this day. has anyone else looked into this?
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Leslie Landry
post Jan 25 2009, 09:17 PM
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QUOTE (Leslie Landry @ Jan 25 2009, 08:14 PM) *
in regards to the Airphones/credit cards, one of the passengers on one of the flights..(the name is slipping my mind at the moment), it was said that during this frantic time, that she called collect to her family member when she had a credit card. I dont know about you but swipping a credit card to would be a hell of alot faster then having to go through the operator and having to wait to get your call accepted. just doesnt add up. This brings to mind on the curiousity on how many credit cards were actually used on the flights to place calls on this day. has anyone else looked into this?



http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?con...va&aid=8514
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albertchampion
post Jan 27 2009, 02:08 AM
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there were no telephone calls from any of the involved aircraft on that day. not airphones. not cell phones.
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trvl4freedom
post Jan 27 2009, 03:25 PM
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QUOTE (787PIC @ Jan 23 2009, 09:54 PM) *
Airphones on commercial aircraft work on limited basis.
The user swipes a major credit card on the face of the phone and dials the number.
On United 757/767s which I flew only six(6) passengers at a time could use the system due to its limitations.
Cell phones generally do not work at all above 2-3000 feet above ground (land based antenna) level.

Ross Aimer


As a flight attendant, I can concur that the Verizon Airfones worked on a limited basis, for only a few people at time, and (at least at Delta) had been almost totally deactivated (due to unreliability) at the time of 9/11. I remember being told that we were in step with the other airlines who were reporting unreliability as well, but I can't say for sure if American and United had begun the deactivation process.

All calls did require you swipe a credit card and the per minute charge was quite high, so there should be a paper trail for every supposed call. There was not an operator function for passengers, although crew (again, at least at Delta) could reach our operations department by dialing a special code with a star in front of it. There was no way to place a collect call.

I found it very strange that one of the flight attendants (I believe it was Betty Ong) was routed to her reservations department -- if this function was available (it wasn't at Delta, I believe because they didn't want passengers calling reservations during ground or air delays to see if they could rebook or to check on their connections) she would not likely have chosen this as her first point of contact regarding a hijacking.

Cell phones absolutely did not work and still do not work at the altitude the calls were supposedly made from on 9/11. Even if they were made at the 2 to 3,000 foot level where land based antenna are, the plane would be moving too fast to lock on to any one antenna. I have seen many a passenger try, and have personally tried this myself and never once have I or they achieved success -- you just simply can't get a signal long enough to complete a call.
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albertchampion
post Jan 27 2009, 10:52 PM
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once again, the heart of the fraud of the "official" story.

without those telecons[and i use "cons" deliberately], then i think that there are no proofs of any hijackings.

no hijackings, then who orchestrated the events of that day?

there are two choices: the usg or the ig.

oh, there is a third choice, an usg/ig consortium.

that would be my choice.
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The artful dodge...
post Jan 28 2009, 08:19 AM
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Sorry to trivialise but I live in a major conurbation and there are places in my house where I can struggle to get a cell signal.
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dMz
post Jan 28 2009, 01:48 PM
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Here is the archive.org copy of the Sept. 13, 2001 CNN story about UA93:
-----
http://web.archive.org/web/20011208162337/...call/index.html

Passengers voted to attack hijackers
-----
Here is a brief quote (there are likely more "interesting" ones as well):

"Passenger Jeremy Glick called his wife Liz and in-laws in New York on a cell phone to say the plane had been hijacked."
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albertchampion
post Jan 29 2009, 08:07 PM
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perhaps someone can tell us how airphones were arranged on 93?

i ask this question because i have noticed that airphone placements may differ from airline to airline, from aircraft to aircraft.

for instance, on some aircraft there were two airphones. one placed near the front galley. and one by the rear bathrooms. with that arrangement, anyone using the airphone had to stand in the aisle.

to the best of my recollection continental provided an airphone for each seat only in the first class compartment.

in my limited experience, it is my recollection that to activate an airphone, even for a call to customer assistance, required the swiping of a credit card. and also to the best of my recollection, out of 100 attempted airphone calls, i think only 2 ever resulted in a connection. and trying to reach customer assistance was never successful.

i also care to make this comment...conducting a conversation over them was next to impossible. difficult to hear over the ambient noise. and the party on the other end was having such a tough time hearing the passenger that shouting so as to be heard was the norm. and was in first class, in front of the engines. i can't imagine what it would have been like closer to the higher levels of engine noise.

in years of flying, i never observed many passengers using the airphones on continental. perhaps that was because road warriors regarded them as sublimely unreliable.

then there is this final thought. all airphones on an aircraft could be disabled with the flick of a single switch. one would think that a band so well trained to fly a commercial airliner on their first attempt would have known to disable the airphones.

so it goes.
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onesliceshort
post Jan 31 2009, 10:23 PM
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QUOTE (albertchampion @ Jan 30 2009, 01:07 AM) *
perhaps someone can tell us how airphones were arranged on 93?

i ask this question because i have noticed that airphone placements may differ from airline to airline, from aircraft to aircraft.

for instance, on some aircraft there were two airphones. one placed near the front galley. and one by the rear bathrooms. with that arrangement, anyone using the airphone had to stand in the aisle.

to the best of my recollection continental provided an airphone for each seat only in the first class compartment.

in my limited experience, it is my recollection that to activate an airphone, even for a call to customer assistance, required the swiping of a credit card. and also to the best of my recollection, out of 100 attempted airphone calls, i think only 2 ever resulted in a connection. and trying to reach customer assistance was never successful.

i also care to make this comment...conducting a conversation over them was next to impossible. difficult to hear over the ambient noise. and the party on the other end was having such a tough time hearing the passenger that shouting so as to be heard was the norm. and was in first class, in front of the engines. i can't imagine what it would have been like closer to the higher levels of engine noise.

in years of flying, i never observed many passengers using the airphones on continental. perhaps that was because road warriors regarded them as sublimely unreliable.

then there is this final thought. all airphones on an aircraft could be disabled with the flick of a single switch. one would think that a band so well trained to fly a commercial airliner on their first attempt would have known to disable the airphones.

so it goes.
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onesliceshort
post Jan 31 2009, 10:38 PM
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what I dont get is how the passengers were able to not only phone but for so long...and so many of them. Where were the hijackers? I asked this before and someone told me that they were all in the cockpit. Though I dont believe this for a minute. Theres no way a gang of highly adrenalized fanatics are going to cram themselves into the cockpit and lock the door for what, 45 minutes? And leave the hostages to their own devices. And I know air personnel are trained to be calm under stress but did it sound too relaxed? Theres training and then theres real life. The conversations sounded scripted to me. I personally thought that Mark Binghams slip up,and this is just a gut feeling, was an intentional mistake to let people know he was being forced to read it. I know its just theory but Ive tried to put myself in their position and it just doesnt sound right.
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