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Barrillium At Ground Zero

9/11 Justice Now
post Jul 2 2010, 12:34 PM
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Hi there I was listening to a recorded phone conversation will Jeffrey Hill who I know is not so popular around here
anyway Jeffrey somehow contacted GZ worked Glenn Klein and in this amazing phone conversation Glenn comfirmed
there was molten metal at ground zero note molten metal does not neccissarily mean there was molten steel Glenn
confimed in the phone conversation that he did not know where it came from whether it was from the steel beams
or not but he did also mention that two inch thick steel beams had been heated up and bent. And Jeffrey Hill mentioned
the fact that NIST denied there was molten steel at ground zero and Glenn responded by saying "that bs I was there I saw
it" Glenn Klien did mention that he was on facebook and even gave out his facebook id so I had a few questions I wanted
to ask him, especially in particular his exposure to Barrillium at ground zero, because during the phone conversation
he mentioned that he found out later he had been exposed to Barrillium at ground zero, and I wanted to find out more
about this barrillium I wanted to know who told him that he had been exposed to Barrillium at ground zero I read on the
internet wikipedia in particular that barrillium is a used to make parts on aircraft, they used to make parts in nuclear
reactors missiles and nuclear weapons so naturally I was a bit concerned given some of these possibilities and I want to
try and track down the source of the Barrillium at ground zero, and I want to know boeing uses barrilium in the manufacture
of their commercial airliners, I was hoping maybe Rob Balsamo could answer this question, what are the other more plausible
possibilties besides nukes and missiles before any of us decide to go overboard, I have just started chatting with Glenn Klein
who has agreed to answer any of my questions in regard to his experience at ground zero and from what I have asked him in
relation to the barrillium at ground zero, the response I have gotton leaves no doubt in my mind that the workers at ground zero
where exposed to Barrillium by breathing it in when they tried to cool down the rubble the pile at ground zero exposing them to
toxic smoke steam containing dangerous levels of Barrillium, given these facts I think it is very important that someone determine
why such a toxic substance was at ground zero when it clearly shouldnt have been, and what exactly put it there a lot of ground zero
workers have died guys as a result of expose to this toxic substance and I think it's about time someone find out where it came from
and if it should have been there, we try find out who put it there and hold them responsible. here is a link to the phone interview with
ground zero work Glenn Klein just incase anyone is interested, and here is text transcript of my conversation with Glenn Klein who seems
like a very nice and great bloke.

9/11 - Ground Zero Molten Metal Confirmed

Here is a link to the youtube version of the phone conversation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-XA0Rv1Ng8
more here:

And here is a link to the forum where you can download an mp3 of the full unedited phone conversation

http://s1.zetaboards.com/pumpshitout/topic/3377263/

And here is a text transcript of my conversation with Mr Klein I will keep the conversation updated when I get another reply to
some other questions I have asked him.

Paul Stockdale July 1 at 10:18pm
Hi there Glenn I was listening to your phone interview with
Jeffrey Hill when you talked about witnessing the molten metal
at ground zero, and I heard you where exposed to barrillium
Im sorry to hear this and that you are sick but I am curious about
the barrillium you unfortunatly encountered while down there and
I just wanted to ask you how you found out you came in contact
with the Barillium, who told you that you had been exposed to the
barrillium at gz, And how did they know you had been exposed if you know? And also I just wanted to know where you breathing it or did you happen to touch it sorry if these question are annoying I am just a curious researcher and would appreciate it heaps if you answer anyone of these questions.

Thanks cheers take care Paul S Glenn Kline July 2 at 12:06am
Paul, I don't know you so before I answer any questions accept my ffriend request.
Sent via Facebook Mobile Paul Stockdale July 2 at 9:20pm
Ok thanks Glenn

Glenn Kline July 2 at 11:43pm
Paul, I know many were exposed to beryllium because its a fact that the shell of Jet planes are made of Beryllium. So are many components of the plane. Also, Beryllium fires are supposed to be put out with sand, foam or dry chemical powder. The fires at GZ were fought with water creating a toxic brew. Many responders breathed in those vapors. Beryllium is also used in computers, cell phones and numerous other items. Several responders are suffering symptoms consistent with Beryllium poisoning. Sarcoidosis symptoms are similar to those of Beryllium poisoning and could easily be misdiagnosed. Many responders are suffering from unexplained rashes and bumps on their skin which is also consistent with the symptoms of Beryllium poisoning.
As for molten metal, yes I did see it at GZ. I dont know if it was from beams that melted or some other kind of metal that melted. I guess now I will never know as I didn't recover any. It didn't seem very unusual to me or anyone else that was with me as we knew the fires burned for many months and metal could easily melt with constant contact to extremely hot flames.
Paul, if you have any other questions let me know. I have no problem talking about this issue. Have a good/safe 4th.
Glen

Paul Stockdale July 3 at 1:45am
Yes thanks Glenn I am just curious as to what color was this molten
metal I only ask this because the color might give an indication as to
what type of metal it was, also did the molten metal have any dark spots because usually molten steel if it where indeed that would form dark spots when it cools, and also how much molten metal
was there was it running down in like streams or was it in like puddles im sorry and also when you where talking over the phone with jeffrey hill you said something like "it was very dangerous stuff"
im confused where you talking about the molten metal or something else and if so what was dangerous about it?
Im terribly sorry asking all these questions but these are
just thing I would really like to know thankyou for taking
the time to talk to me and answer my questions after this
I really dont think I will have any more questions I cant think of
anything else to ask, actually where you there when building 7
came down? Sorry I hope all of these questions are not bothering you too much thanks for your time.

Take care cheers Paul
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rob balsamo
post Jul 2 2010, 12:47 PM
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hmmm.... interesting...

I would think that normal transport category aircraft do not use too much beryllium or any at all due to its toxicity.

Commercial use of beryllium metal presents technical challenges due to the toxicity (especially by inhalation) of beryllium-containing dusts. Beryllium produces a direct corrosive effect to tissue, and can cause a chronic life-threatening allergic disease called berylliosis in susceptible persons.



However, given our latest research regarding the high speeds reported for the aircraft which are observed to impact the towers....


Because of its stiffness, light weight and dimensional stability over a wide temperature range, beryllium metal is used for lightweight structural components in the defense and aerospace industries in high-speed aircraft, missiles, space vehicles and communication satellites. Several liquid-fuel rockets use nozzles of pure beryllium.


Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beryllium#Nuclear


hmmm....
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rob balsamo
post Jul 2 2010, 01:08 PM
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Here's more...

Development of structural beryllium technology at McDonnell comprising both hardware and study programs is discussed, including wing-box structures, F-4 and SST rudders, F-4 brakes, and crack propagation and damage tolerant design evaluations. Impediments to a more extensive use of beryllium are discussed and areas requiring further study and development defined. http://papers.sae.org/680330/


July 10, 2006: Boeing Workers Seek Medical Monitoring Claim for Beryllium-Related Injuries
Boeing workers are seeking to recover the costs of medical monitoring without proving actual physical injury from beryllium exposure. The plaintiffs allege that they were exposed to beryllium while working on the manufacture of space shuttle parts, and have asked the Mississippi Supreme Court to find that state law permits a cause of action for medical monitoring. http://injury.findlaw.com/beryllium/beryllium-news.html




After some quick searching, Beryllium seems to be only in use on perhaps 767 brakes and perhaps some tubing, on a standard 767. Certainly not enough to see in molten form and produce such harmful effects.

It is used for wing boxes and structures on aircraft capable of much higher speeds, such as the F-4, rockets, missiles, the Space Shuttle.. .etc.

I guess we now have one dot connected as to how the 767-200 could have been "beefed" up to achieve such excessive speeds.
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lunk
post Jul 2 2010, 10:18 PM
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An incandescent light-bulb contains tungsten,
Although a necessary component, it is a very tiny part of the entire light-bulb,
(compared to the alleged tungsten, found at much greater percentages, inside gold bars, for instance)

Aluminum has a lower melting point than iron, perhaps that was the molten metal, in the rubble at gz. if it wasn't iron.
But even then, i doubt that even if an entire aircraft was melted, the melted metal would stay hot for over 3 months, as was reported after the wtc demolition.
The source of the molten metal is likely from a melted part of the structure of the towers, not the planes.

Now what can cause that amount of metal to melt, and stay hot for months,
is an entire different question.

Thermate?
Nuclear?
or some advanced secret technology?

or a combination of some,
or all of these?

Airplanes, were the cover,
not the cause.

The towers were designed to withstand and absorb aircraft impacts.

...So, the demolition of the towers would not be affected?
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9/11 Justice Now
post Jul 3 2010, 01:44 AM
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QUOTE (rob balsamo @ Jul 3 2010, 03:08 AM) *
Here's more...

Development of structural beryllium technology at McDonnell comprising both hardware and study programs is discussed, including wing-box structures, F-4 and SST rudders, F-4 brakes, and crack propagation and damage tolerant design evaluations. Impediments to a more extensive use of beryllium are discussed and areas requiring further study and development defined. http://papers.sae.org/680330/


July 10, 2006: Boeing Workers Seek Medical Monitoring Claim for Beryllium-Related Injuries
Boeing workers are seeking to recover the costs of medical monitoring without proving actual physical injury from beryllium exposure. The plaintiffs allege that they were exposed to beryllium while working on the manufacture of space shuttle parts, and have asked the Mississippi Supreme Court to find that state law permits a cause of action for medical monitoring. http://injury.findlaw.com/beryllium/beryllium-news.html




After some quick searching, Beryllium seems to be only in use on perhaps 767 brakes and perhaps some tubing, on a standard 767. Certainly not enough to see in molten form and produce such harmful effects.

It is used for wing boxes and structures on aircraft capable of much higher speeds, such as the F-4, rockets, missiles, the Space Shuttle.. .etc.

I guess we now have one dot connected as to how the 767-200 could have been "beefed" up to achieve such excessive speeds.


Yes but what I dont understand is what parts of the planes that would replace AA 175 & AA Flight 11 would be made of Barrillium
to make them strong so they could withstand the excessive speeds sry I dont understand much about planes aircraft I am no pilot
or expert, and also I am beggining to suspect that the molten stream seen flowing out of the towers and the molten steel metal
witnessed at ground zero could actually be molten Barrillium because as I undertsand it Barriliium is a form of steel and it has a low
melting point a lower one thatn steel also it would be interesting to find out if molten Barrillium could form flakes when it is in a molten form.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_melt...nt_of_beryllium

Melting Point: 1287.0 C
Boiling Point: 2469.0 C
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lunk
post Jul 3 2010, 03:03 AM
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QUOTE (9/11 Justice Now @ Jul 2 2010, 10:44 PM) *
Yes but what I dont understand is what parts of the planes that would replace AA 175 & AA Flight 11 would be made of Barrillium
to make them strong so they could withstand the excessive speeds sry I dont understand much about planes aircraft I am no pilot
or expert, and also I am beggining to suspect that the molten stream seen flowing out of the towers and the molten steel metal
witnessed at ground zero could actually be molten Barrillium because as I undertsand it Barriliium is a form of steel and it has a low
melting point a lower one thatn steel also it would be interesting to find out if molten Barrillium could form flakes when it is in a molten form.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_melt...nt_of_beryllium

Melting Point: 1287.0 C
Boiling Point: 2469.0 C


Yes, but the volume of beryllium, in an alloy of a metal, would be minuscule.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beryllium_copper#Alloys

QUOTE
Beryllium copper, also known as copper beryllium, BeCu or beryllium bronze, is a metal alloy of copper and 0.5 to 3% beryllium, and sometimes with other alloying elements. Beryllium Copper combines high strength with non-magnetic and non-sparking qualities.
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IslandPilot
post Jul 4 2010, 04:02 AM
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As LUNK points out Copper and Beryllium go together like Love and Marrige (used to). And they have been combined together as alloys for quite some time.

Back in the late 60.s I worked for a company that supplied cables and flexible copper "shunts" (laminated horseshoe shaped conductors) used in spot welding guns at the auto plants, when they used to make cars. At that place they drilled millions of holes into copper products every year. The Beryllium Copper we used was in strips .005 to .020 thick... and compared to normal "half-hard" drawn copper... it was like comparing SPRING STEEL to semi-wet noodles. I suppose it might also be like comparing Titanium to beer can aluminum. The Beryllium really made a big difference in the physical properties of Copper.

And I'm sure that exotic alloys employing Beryllium would be used in rockets and missiles, more than in aircraft, except in the areas already mentioned like brakes. I wouldn't be surprised to learn of it being used in the Hot Section of jet engines in turbine blades and combustion chamber parts. And it might also be used in special coatings combined with copper and applied at very high temperatures to turbine parts to improve heat transfer and cooling on some parts.

But I would imagine that you'd find much more Beryllium-Copper being used in the machinery inside the buildings. I am thinking most likely useage would be in heating and airconditioning heat exschangers, high pressure plumbing, window frames, and misc spring clips fasteners within the building interior. and possibly in elevator shafts for guide rails and electrical "slip joints" to provide power to the cars.????

We never knew about beryllium toxicity back in those days. So, about 30 years later, I learn about various mineral deposits in the Toledo, OH area, where people were talking about the Beryllium plant that had to be shut down, because of lawsuits from workers. I don't know if they did something to "clean the place up" or somehow make the process less hazardous, because the last time I flew over that area, it seemed to be working to me.
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