IPB




POSTS MADE TO THIS FORUM ARE THE SOLE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE AUTHOR AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF PILOTS FOR 911 TRUTH
FOR OFFICIAL PILOTS FOR 9/11 TRUTH STATEMENTS AND ANALYSIS, PLEASE VISIT PILOTSFOR911TRUTH.ORG

WELCOME - PLEASE REGISTER OR LOG IN FOR FULL FORUM ACCESS ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Squawk Code Changes

kawika
post Oct 1 2011, 07:24 PM
Post #1





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 457
Joined: 16-August 07
From: Upstate NY/VT border
Member No.: 1,719



Is it normal for squawk codes to be changed by pilots. Do ATCs ever ask pilots for them to be changed?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
amazed!
post Oct 2 2011, 10:33 AM
Post #2





Group: Extreme Forum Pilot
Posts: 3,920
Joined: 14-December 06
From: Fort Pierce, FL
Member No.: 331



This question has been asked before here, and the answer is yes, transponder codes can be changed only in the cockpit, and yes, it is fairly common for ATC to have pilots change the code, depending upon a wide variety of circumstances.

In the IFR system, most codes are not changed from origin to destination, but it does happen from time to time.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kawika
post Oct 2 2011, 11:32 AM
Post #3





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 457
Joined: 16-August 07
From: Upstate NY/VT border
Member No.: 1,719



QUOTE (amazed! @ Sep 30 2011, 12:33 PM) *
This question has been asked before here, and the answer is yes, transponder codes can be changed only in the cockpit, and yes, it is fairly common for ATC to have pilots change the code, depending upon a wide variety of circumstances.

In the IFR system, most codes are not changed from origin to destination, but it does happen from time to time.


Please elaborate. How are the codes determined? ATC finds one available and directs the pilot to change to a certain code? The computer has a running list of codes that can be used? Do the codes have any rhyme or reason by location?

I am researching the AA77 and UA175 code changes trying to understand why this would be necessary. In the case of AA77 the change did correspond closely to another code sequence already being used elsewhere.

In the case of UA175 the ATC says he lost him and I am trying to figure out what that meant. See the TMUDD Audio post

http://pilotsfor911truth.org/forum/index.p...;#entry10801332

I asked Colin about this and he said ATC may have lost him visually. I'm still baffled about why a code change and lack of radio contact did not set off alarms.

Thank you

This post has been edited by kawika: Oct 2 2011, 11:42 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
amazed!
post Oct 13 2011, 09:36 AM
Post #4





Group: Extreme Forum Pilot
Posts: 3,920
Joined: 14-December 06
From: Fort Pierce, FL
Member No.: 331



Sorry for the late reply.

Transponder codes are assigned by ATC. For an IFR flight originating at any airport, the code is given to the crew before departure. After takeoff, the flight is recognized by its code.

Codes are also assigned by ATC to VFR flights IF they enter the system with "flight following" or other functions. Those assigned to VFR flights are more commonly changed sometimes being handed off from sector to sector, assuming the flight goes more than 200 miles or so.

Code changes for IFR flights are less common, but it does happen. It is common for an aircraft to have a code departing Miami, for example, and keep that code all the way to Chicago.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kawika
post Oct 13 2011, 10:37 AM
Post #5





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 457
Joined: 16-August 07
From: Upstate NY/VT border
Member No.: 1,719



QUOTE (amazed! @ Oct 11 2011, 11:36 AM) *
Sorry for the late reply.

Transponder codes are assigned by ATC. For an IFR flight originating at any airport, the code is given to the crew before departure. After takeoff, the flight is recognized by its code.

Codes are also assigned by ATC to VFR flights IF they enter the system with "flight following" or other functions. Those assigned to VFR flights are more commonly changed sometimes being handed off from sector to sector, assuming the flight goes more than 200 miles or so.

Code changes for IFR flights are less common, but it does happen. It is common for an aircraft to have a code departing Miami, for example, and keep that code all the way to Chicago.


The question remains: If ATC did not direct a code change, how was it accomplished? Twice in the case of UA175.

It is unique, as the other three flights turned off the beacon. In the case of UA93 it was turned off and then resumed right before crashing.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
amazed!
post Oct 13 2011, 04:13 PM
Post #6





Group: Extreme Forum Pilot
Posts: 3,920
Joined: 14-December 06
From: Fort Pierce, FL
Member No.: 331



Well remember that we are reading a written script--a story made up by somebody. The story is so detailed and "complete" that the bad guys even drove to Maine from Boston so that they could come back to Boston. And of course leave all sorts of incriminating "evidence" in their rental car.

So the point is that whether the transponder code was changed, or the unit was turned off, or whatever, we have no way of knowing if that was true and actually happened, or if it's just part of the elaborate story given to the media.

And either way, does it really matter? Other evidence suggests strongly that 93 and 77 might not have existed as actual aircraft, as there is no evidence supporting their crashes and we don't know if they were the ones that ended up in Cleveland or elsewhere.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
23investigator
post Oct 15 2011, 07:59 AM
Post #7





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 376
Joined: 28-November 10
From: Australia
Member No.: 5,467



The question remains: If ATC did not direct a code change, how was it accomplished? Twice in the case of UA175.

It is unique, as the other three flights turned off the beacon. In the case of UA93 it was turned off and then resumed right before crashing.
[/quote]

Dear 'kawika'

Do I understand your question correctly.

Is it, if ATC nominate the 'squawk code' numbers, how would they be able to identify that the numbers for a particular aircraft had been changed, if they had not instructed for them to be changed?

In other words do those new 'squawk code' numbers, still realate to the original secondary radar plot details, if they have not been changed by the ATC?

This is not a question, based with any knowledge of how it works, more a question trying to get an understanding of how it does work.

Robert
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kawika
post Oct 15 2011, 09:32 AM
Post #8





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 457
Joined: 16-August 07
From: Upstate NY/VT border
Member No.: 1,719



QUOTE (23investigator @ Oct 13 2011, 09:59 AM) *
The question remains: If ATC did not direct a code change, how was it accomplished? Twice in the case of UA175.

It is unique, as the other three flights turned off the beacon. In the case of UA93 it was turned off and then resumed right before crashing.


Dear 'kawika'

Do I understand your question correctly.

Is it, if ATC nominate the 'squawk code' numbers, how would they be able to identify that the numbers for a particular aircraft had been changed, if they had not instructed for them to be changed?

In other words do those new 'squawk code' numbers, still realate to the original secondary radar plot details, if they have not been changed by the ATC?

This is not a question, based with any knowledge of how it works, more a question trying to get an understanding of how it does work.

Robert


I am seeking an explanation of exactly how it does/should work.

I have heard the audio and read the transcripts of the ATC telling UA175 to reset the transponder back to 1470. Clearly they were aware of the change.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
amazed!
post Oct 15 2011, 11:03 AM
Post #9





Group: Extreme Forum Pilot
Posts: 3,920
Joined: 14-December 06
From: Fort Pierce, FL
Member No.: 331



I'm not a controller, but my understanding is that ATC can read the code each aircraft is squawking.

Their reasons for having one change his code is so that it won't conflict, duplicate, that code with another aircraft already in, or about to enter, a given sector of airspace.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kawika
post Oct 15 2011, 12:11 PM
Post #10





Group: Active Forum Pilot
Posts: 457
Joined: 16-August 07
From: Upstate NY/VT border
Member No.: 1,719



QUOTE (amazed! @ Oct 13 2011, 01:03 PM) *
I'm not a controller, but my understanding is that ATC can read the code each aircraft is squawking.

Their reasons for having one change his code is so that it won't conflict, duplicate, that code with another aircraft already in, or about to enter, a given sector of airspace.


My assumption is that codes are computer generated, ATCs instruct the pilots to set them. If a pilot set the code randomly that should be a giant red flag for the ATC. For a hijacker to do this deliberately would be an invitation to be visited by F-16s.

If the pilot set it randomly how would he be absolutely sure no other craft was using the same code?

For UA175 to do it twice is very odd. For UA175 to do it right when AA11 was striking WTC1 is even stranger.

But for ATCs to say they lost him, when they could see two code changes, well that is just bizarre.

This post has been edited by kawika: Oct 15 2011, 12:12 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
amazed!
post Oct 16 2011, 10:51 AM
Post #11





Group: Extreme Forum Pilot
Posts: 3,920
Joined: 14-December 06
From: Fort Pierce, FL
Member No.: 331



I would not call it a giant red flag, because people do, from time to time, enter the wrong code. ATC tells the pilot he has set the wrong code, he corrects it, and life goes on.

That ATC stated "they lost him" is more evidence, IMO, that the system was spoofed that day. Not conclusive evidence, but supporting evidence.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 




RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th September 2014 - 01:55 AM